Tolerance

This Saturday is International Day for Tolerance. You may have heard the word “tolerance” before as it is one of our core British values. But what does it actually mean?

In essence, tolerance is about respecting cultures, beliefs and opinions that are different to your own. It means treating someone well — even if you disagree with them — or if their family looks different to yours.

We are lucky that Britain is a diverse country. It is home to people from all over the world, of all major religions. It is home to people with disabilities, who speak different languages and have every shade of skin colour. We all have different experiences, and this makes us strong.

However, not everyone respects people who they see as different. Sometimes, they can say or do cruel things. Some people can be racist, sexist or Islamophobic.

So, what can we do about it? Often, intolerance towards others is rooted in fear. We are more likely to fear things that we do not understand, so the best way to be tolerant is to learn about other cultures and beliefs. Try having a conversation with someone who has a different religion to you, or speaks another language. You might be amazed by how much you have in common!

Read Our Story

Assembly

In this video, Liverpool Football Club’s Mo Salah talks about his career, and how it felt to leave Egypt to play football in Europe. As a Muslim footballer who lives in the UK, he has become a symbol of tolerance and respect. What can we learn from him?

Activities

  1. Write a story or draw a picture inspired by the word “tolerance”.
  2. Choose a religion that is not your own, or that you don’t know much about, and write a fact file about its history, beliefs, and traditions.