Pollution-free trains to launch in two years

Full steam ahead! The new trains will be built by a business called Alstom.

Are trains the best way to travel? The new “Breeze” trains are quieter, faster and good for the environment. It could be the biggest change in the 200-year history of British railways.

What’s happening

The trains of the future are almost here. In just two years, the first water-powered trains could be chugging along UK railways.

The new models, which are called “Breeze” trains, use hydrogen to make electricity. Hydrogen is the main ingredient in water.

Find out more

The first railway in the UK opened in 1825, running between Stockton and Darlington in the north of England. Old-fashioned steam trains were powered by burning coal.

Currently, trains in the UK have diesel engines. This causes pollution, which is bad for the environment and can give people lung problems.

The new trains do not produce any harmful gases, only water. They speed up faster and are quieter than normal trains.

Are trains the best way to travel?

Some say…

Yes! The railways helped build the modern world by connecting people and moving machinery. On trains, you can watch the beautiful countryside go past or sit back and get lost in a book. It is great!

Others think…

No! Trains are often late. If they are busy you might have to sit with strangers, or not get a seat at all! It is much better to go exactly where you want in a car with just your family.

You Decide

  1. What is the best and worst thing about travelling on trains?

Activities

  1. Design your own train of the future. Draw and decorate it. What is it called? What would use for fuel?

Some People Say...

“My favorite mode of transport is hot-air ballooning.”

Richard Branson

What do you think?

Word Watch

Hydrogen
A chemical that mixes with oxygen to make water.
Currently
Now.
Diesel
An oil like petrol.
Pollution
When bad gases go into the air and make it dirty.
Produce
To make something.

Subjects

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